Archive for the ‘reading’ category

What Miracle?

December 20, 2016
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Future Santa in his sleigh?

Here we go, lying to our children. Again. About a jolly, ageless man in a red suit, miraculously popping down a billion chimneys or magically passing through walls to deliver gifts to all the youngsters of the world in a single night. Then, we’re drawn along as though by some magnetic power and forced to buy! buy! buy!

Things.

Why?

To step back from the frenzy is a) to see how ridiculous it is, or, more hopefully, b) to search for the deeper meaning in this, the last month of the year…in children’s Christmas concerts at school, in the music we only listen to in December, or in the opportunities at every turn, church, grocery store, street corner, to give to those less fortunate.

I was in a shop downtown with my six-year-old buying a present for a family member. Suddenly my son looked up at me and said, “Santa isn’t real. Magic reindeer? How does that work?”

I should have patted him on the back and sighed with relief. I should have told him the truth. After all, when the tooth fairy forgot to come the other night, and there were no questions about “real” versus “fairy” I had to wonder, are my children naive? Stupid? Gullible?

One of the books I bought for my daughter this season was A Tree Grows In Brooklyn, by Betty Smith. I couldn’t resist taking a peek. In one scene, Smith’s main character has just delivered her first baby at age 18. She solicits her mother’s advice about how to give her daughter a better life than she has had. Her mother says:

“And you must tell the child the legends I told you—as my mother told them to me and her mother to her. You must tell the fairy tales of the old country. You must tell of those not of the earth who live forever in the hearts of people—fairies, elves, dwarves and such…. and you must not forget the Kris Kringle. The child must believe in him until she reaches the age of six.”

“Mother, I know there are no ghosts or fairies. I would be teaching the child foolish lies.”

Mary [her mother] spoke sharply. “You do not know whether there are not ghosts on earth or angels in heaven.”

“I know there is no Santa Claus.”

“Yet you must teach the child that these things are so.”

“Why? When I, myself, do not believe?”

“Because,” explained Mary Rommely, simply, “the child must have a valuable thing which is called imagination. The child must have a secret world in which live things that never were. It is necessary that she believe. She must start out by believing in things not of this world. Then when the world becomes too ugly for living in, the child can reach back and live in her imagination. I, myself, even in this day and at my age, have great need of recalling the miraculous lives of the Saints and the great miracles that have come to pass on earth. Only by having these things in my mind can I live beyond what I have to live for.”

Instead of responding to my son’s queries in that downtown shop, I allowed him the candy cane the clerk offered. I remembered the images I had as a child of a jolly Santa hurrying through the air behind his team of reindeer.

I can still hear those bells.

IMPORTANT: Libraries

October 7, 2016

IMG_4107Please, do not close libraries. My children have learned first words and important stories among the books and caring librarians of these establishments. We have spent countless hours of family time in libraries, made new friends, felt part of a community in this otherwise fractured and isolating world. The digital age can NEVER replace what a library does for a community. To be “lost in a book” is an activity, and event, a love that is essential for the intellectual needs of each and every human. A library is where we can all spread out, be drawn to the areas of our own interest, but rush back to each other to share pictures or words in respectful whispers….. Each of these activities teaches us something about being human than a computer never, ever could. We need the opportunities for not only literacy, but also for person-to-person contact that a library offers.

An important novel about truth and reconciliation: The Heaviness of Things That Float, by Jennifer Manuel

June 21, 2016

A truly conscientious writer brings first-hand experience, research, and timeless understanding to a relevant issue. For this reason Jennifer Manuel’s debut novel, The Heaviness of Things That Float is well worth talking about.

The novel is set in a remote, First Nations reserve on the west coast of Canada, off Vancouver Island. The reserve is fictional, but the setting is real. This is the landscape of Emily Carr, who purposefully and respectfully inserted herself into a wilderness that few outsiders had entered. Like Carr, Manuel took a leap of faith as an artist to write as a white person, an outsider, living among people who have inhabited the land they’ve called home for thousands of years. Manuel spent time among the Tahltan and Nuu-chah-nulth peoples, as a treaty archivist and then as a teacher, and this novel grew out of those experiences. It is clear, through the loving attention to the details of the landscape, the stories, the mythology, and the characterization of those who populate her novel, how much those years have meant to the author.

To write about blood and culture other than the one you’ve been born into is difficult terrain to navigate, even in fiction. In this case, the stakes are high, given the shameful fact of colonial history, residential schools and racism towards Indigenous peoples. In her author’s note, Manuel states that the novel “is about understanding privilege.” It is also a story about belonging, loneliness, and, I believe, more about what unites, rather than what divides us as humans. It is a most welcome addition to the current discussion of truth and reconciliation.

One way Manuel executes this difficult task brilliantly is through the intimacy of her first person narrator. Manuel leaves no stone unturned in her depiction of Bernadette. We see Bernadette as she goes about her work as a nurse, and we are inside her body to feel her joys, her sorrows, her shame and her confusion.

Chase Charlie, a character who is dear to Bernadette’s heart for reasons that become clear as the novel unfolds, is missing. The potential tragedy inherent in this situation is magnified by the fact that Bernadette is scheduled to retire, and she plans to move away from the community. Bernadette is filled with doubt about leaving. She has spent forty years in Tawakin. Her one connection to the outside world, her sister, has passed away, and her sense of belonging is an idea she has tried not to think about. Her confusion about where she truly belongs, in the community of the reserve, or in the city, is believable. She has loved and been loved in Tawakin, and her responsibilities as both a nurse and a friend on this reserve have kept her busy. Manuel sets up a reasonable suspension of disbelief, and anchors it in her very animated characters. For example, Loretta, who “could find a way to blame God, the Lord Almighty Himself, for her own sins. I could picture her entry through the pearly gates, screaming at Him until her face turned red. Hurling cherubs across the firmament like bowling balls.”

There is humour in this book, because humour is part of the nature of the people. But the story leaves only precious slivers of space for laughter, for there is more than enough tragedy, suicide, accidental death, and hurt among this tiny community to last several generations. Manuel illuminates this contrast between joy and sorrow, makes it shine like the treasures that wash up on shore, the glass balls from Japanese fishing boats, the dentalia shells used to make dance shawls.

Most importantly, we are asked, “without knowing the truth, could there ever be a genuine reconciliation?”

I am pleased to add The Heaviness of Things That Float to my shelf of favourite books. Like Emily Carr’s Kleewyck, it is one I will return to.

As for the terrors ahead…

December 31, 2015

You’d think we’d never seen food before. December 31st, 11AM in the grocery store, and the line snakes around the centre displays of gift cards and bananas. We’re all at the same thing, gathering to consume larger amounts of the things we eat on a regular basis anyway.

What else is there to life but the necessity to feed, take shelter, and celebrate survival at the end of each year?

I pull out a book (I’ve taken the advice of Stephen King, never leave home without one). David Grossman, See Under: Love. I read:

Momik tells Mr. Munin about [the latest spaceship] Pioneer 4 and Munin jumps up and lifts Momik high in the air, and hugs him with all his might, to his prickly whiskers, and his coat and the stink, and he dances wildly all around the yard, a strange and frightening dance under the sky and the treetops and the sun, and Momik is afraid someone passing by will see him like this, and Munin’s two black coattails fly up in the air behind him, and he doesn’t let Momik down until he’s all worn out, and then he takes a crumpled piece of paper out of his pocket and looks around to see if anyone’s watching, and then he crooks his finger for Momik to come closer, and Momik who’s still pretty dizzy comes closer and sees it’s a kind of map with names written on it in a language he doesn’t understand…. Munin whispers in his face, “The Lord redeemeth in the twinkling of an eye, and the sons of light soar high,” and then he imitates a flying leap with his big hand and says, “Feeiiiww!” so loud and furiously that Momik who is still dizzy trips over a stone and falls down, and that’s when Momik with his very own eyes saw stinky black hilarious Munin taking off diagonally in a strong wind to the sky like the prophet Elijah in his chariot maybe, and at that moment, a moment he would never-ever-black-and-blue forget, he understood at long last that Munin was actually a kind of secret magician….

When I look up, a woman who was grunting in an attempt to get her shopping cart through the line has suddenly smiled at the crowd that parts just for her, and a child who was crying decides to laugh.

I consume books, in line at the grocery store, at home between work and guiding the kids to figure out how to clean up after themselves. I’m reading Geraldine Brooks’ latest, The Secret Chord. I adore the brilliance of Brooks’ historical fiction!

I dip into my daughter’s pile, but I never have enough time for fantasy, so I demand she summarizes all of her fiction I am missing.

I pull out one of my fav’s, Anakana Schofield’s Malarky.I love this one, and re-visit it for the brilliant voice, the surprising plot twists and depth of vulnerability of the main character.

Then I’m on to dancer memoirs, sheer, raw, admirable, take-my-breath-away perseverance in Agnes de Mille’s Dance to the Piper, and the much more recent  Life in Motion, by Misty Copeland. I prefer de Mille’s writing, the density, the wide world view she presents of life in the 1920s, 30s and 40s, but Copeland’s story is no less riveting.

There’s a different kind of dancing in Bohumil Hrabal’s Dancing Lessons for the Advanced in Age, a hilarious, one-sentence freak show, loveable, dirty old man, and in Karel Capek’s War with the Newts.

I’ve begun my own read-around-the-world, and I wonder how many of the books (thanks for Tweeting it, Gemma!) from Ann Morgan’s list I could get through, in 2016.

But I have my own project to work through in the coming year. My friend, Sharon Bala, says, tell everyone you are writing a novel and it will keep you to task.

So here it is: I will finish a first draft of my novel in 2016. For my Master’s thesis, but really, for me. Resolution: have a goal, stick with it. And in the dark of self-doubt, when weeks go by where laundry and doctor’s appointments seems to take precedence over my work, I will Dance to the Piper and persevere.

Or, as in my daughter’s favourite line from Bridge to Terebithia:

As for the terrors ahead, well, you just have to stand up to your fear and not let it squeeze you white.